/ / The Ultimate List of Best Ukuleles Under 200 Dollars 2020

The Ultimate List of Best Ukuleles Under 200 Dollars 2020

Best Ukuleles

People have recently been more eager to learn a string instrument, but the guitar proves to have quite a high learning curve for people who want to get into playing. This is where ukuleles come into the picture as the four-string instrument proves to be a better gateway for getting into playing string instruments. It’s a lot smaller than a typical guitar, and it sounds less warm yet it packs a lot of tones from the high end. It’s a lot easier and more comfortable to bring around, making it a perfect choice for beginners who want to get into strumming away in no time. Today, we’re checking out 8 ukuleles at $200 and below. Without further ado, take a look at our list below!

Top 8 Ukuleles Under $200

Fiber Concert Ukulele

The Enya Concert Ukulele AcousticPlus Nova is a beast that’s unaware of its full potential. Made from great material, it boasts amazing tones and good looks at the best possible price.

Read Our Review
4.8 rating
4.8
4.8
4.8 rating
Baritone Ukulele

Caramel’s $200 and below entry proves to be quite the showstopper, offering Aquila super nylgut strings, wood with a fantastic finish, and an overall quality that makes it quite hard to beat.

Read Our Review
4.8 rating
4.8
4.8
4.8 rating
4-String Ukulele

Kala would always be the best ukulele brand that would never fail to deliver. This is a perfect beginner to intermediate instrument, as it balances tone, sound, and style very well.

Read Our Review
4.7 rating
4.7
4.7
4.7 rating
Tenor Ukulele

Enya’s solid wood offering deserves the 4th spot on our list, as they offer the most comprehensive package -all in good quality and at a very great price.

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4.6 rating
4.6
4.6
4.6 rating
Bamboo Tenor Ukulele

Not all ukuleles are made equal, and this bamboo ukulele drives that nail’s head down hard. It’s a different feel and a different tone at the premium quality of a Kala ukulele guitar. What more can you ask for?

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4.6 rating
4.6
4.6
4.6 rating
Mahogany Concert Ukulele

Newcomer Luna offers an acoustic electric ukulele with a slight cutaway like no other. It also boasts a tattoo-like engraving reminiscent of shark teeth, to represent how well it cuts through the market with this unique offering.

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4.5 rating
4.5
4.5
4.5 rating
Mahogany Tenor Ukulele

Packed with over the top guides and tutorials, the Bondi Mahogany tenor ukulele bundle makes sure you learn everything you need while also providing an item that’s sure to excite and satisfy.

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4.4 rating
4.4
4.4
4.4 rating
EleUke Peanut Ukulele

This non-standard shaped acoustic electric ukulele entry boasts simplicity and beauty while also giving the functions needed for its electric fixtures and build.

Read Our Review
4.3 rating
4.3
4.3
4.3 rating

1. Enya Carbon Fiber Concert Ukulele – The Trailblazer’s Choice

Fiber Concert Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.8 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: 30% Carbon Fiber & Polycarbonate
  • Thickness: 2 inches
  • Weight: 1.25 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: acoustic-electric hybrid

This ukulele stands a bit different from all the others – not just by it’s material but also with the sound it produces. Made from a merry mix of polycarbonate and carbon fiber, the Enya Concert Ukulele AcousticPlus Nova is definitely a choice to beat and an option to choose from. Even if it’s material and shape is far from being standard, the quality of sound and tone it produces makes up for all the skepticism. With the acoustic electric ukulele being all the hype right now, this one easily stands out to the top.

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Aesthetic
  • Great tone and sound
  • Pre-installed high-quality pickups with effects

Cons

  • The cutaway may prove to be quite limiting for other players
  • Strict with the type of strings to work with
  • The neck feel might not be for everyone

2. Caramel Ebony Baritone ukulele – The Aesthetic Choice

Baritone Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.8 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Baritone
  • Material: Ebony Wood/Rosewood
  • Thickness: 5.5 inches
  • Weight: 5.24 pound
  • Outstanding feature: the built-in pickup with tuner and EQ

Caramel proves that it’s hefty entry is worth every penny. Boasting a Rosewood/Ebony Wood laminate, this baritone ukulele proves to be quite a contender despite being on the larger end of most ukuleles. The finish is just beautifully splendid, the feel is wonderfully amazing, and the quality and playability are top-notch. Despite Caramel being a hit-or-miss manufacturer, this one is definitely a surefire hit that would make any owner happily strumming away to all their favorite tunes.

Pros

  • Ebony wood or Rosewood body and neck
  • Unique design and soundhole
  • Great gear tuners and fretboard
  • Sound hole position might be limiting for other players
  • Might be too big for some 
  • Tuning differences due to size might serve as a learning curve

Cons

  • Sound hole position might be limiting for other players
  • Might be too big for some 
  • Tuning differences due to size might serve as a learning curve

3. Kala Mahogany Tenor Ukulele – The Signature Choice

4-String Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.7 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 3.75 inches
  • Weight: 1 pound
  • Outstanding feature: a learn-to-play entry with a signature look

Kala is a surefire brand that’s known for its top quality guitars. A lot of musicians opt for this brand for their live gigs and recordings, as its finesse never fails to show. This specific ukulele bundle offers a Mandy Harvey signature made from a mahogany top, back, sides, and neck. It’s one of the more accessible ukuleles on the market. Made from solid wood, the solid mahogany body definitely knows how to deliver sounds while the mahogany neck offers a great feel and playability.

Pros

  • It offers signature style and sound at a competitive price
  • It has a comprehensive learn-to-play package
  • It boasts Aquila super nylgut strings

Cons

  • The others may not like the aesthetic 
  • Some might opt out of the learn-to-play and a better ukulele at the same price point

4. Enya X1 Tenor Ukulele – The Complete Choice

Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.6 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 5.79 inches
  • Weight: 4.4 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: it’s the most comprehensive kit at such a great price point

Enya defies all odds with the X1 Tenor Ukulele, making the Kala question its existence. It’s one of the best ukuleles under 200 in this list, with only its number of peripherals being both its pro and con. The set unquestionably drives the price of the ukulele bundle up, but it’s comprehensive offerings make it super hard to say no to. Accessories aside, the ukulele itself is of outstanding quality. Despite being a new name to the scene and a very ambitious entry to the list, it does make up for it given what it can provide.

Pros

  • Amazing price point
  • Great peripherals and accessories
  • Astounding woodwork and finish

Cons

  • It has Daddario strings instead of the standard Aquila
  • Some may want to opt-out of the inclusions to get the ukulele at a cheaper price 

5. Kala Bamboo Tenor Ukulele – The Superbly Unique Choice

Bamboo Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.6 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: Bamboo
  • Thickness: 4.72 inches
  • Weight: : 3.39 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: rare all-bamboo build

Thriving inside the Kala KA line, this charming surprise entry offers bamboo top, back, and sides in premium Kala KA fashion. Confusing and confounding as it may be for many, you definitely shouldn’t knock it until you’ve tried it. Equipped with Aquila super nylgut strings, a Graph Tech NuBone nut, and top quality gear tuners with pearl buttons, it’s definitely a taste of the Kala expertise on the bamboo with a natural satin finish.

Pros

  • Sturdier build quality
  • Great peripherals and accessories
  • Great size that’s perfect for anyone to get into

Cons

  • If the wood isn’t well dried, it might shrink and affect the quality
  • The sound it produces might not be for everyone

6. Luna Mahogany Concert Ukulele – The Exquisite Choice

Mahogany Concert Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.5 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: Satin Finish Mahogany/ Pacific Walnut
  • Thickness: 2.8 inches
  • Weight: 5 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: amazing design, subtle cutaway (rare), and quality pickup system

This up-and-comer proves that it’s more than meets the eye, boasting a mahogany top, back, and sides. On the other hand, there’s also the Pacific Walnut fingerboard and bridge, easily making this one the best ukuleles under 200 to date. It offers an acoustic electric system for gigging, recording, or monitoring, making it quite a ferocious entry to a rather tame list.

Pros

  • Great design
  • Great (and pretty rare) shape 
  • Great instrument quality, peripherals and build

Cons

  • The cutaway and finish might not appeal to everyone 

7. Bondi Mahogany Tenor Ukulele

Mahogany Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.4 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 4.33 inches
  • Weight: 3.96 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: great lineup of accessories and fairly okay guitar

Bondi’s entry may seemingly be at the far end, but it surely managed to make the list. Boasting a colorful padded gig bag to go with the accessories and most importantly the mahogany-clad ukulele, this entry proves to be a worthy competitor of all the eight listings. The ukulele included is typical fare – a standard tenor with a satin finish, aquila strings, and a solid mahogany neck, back, and sides. It’s a no-brainer on why it became a top ukulele under 200, and all the inclusions it comes with is technically only a bonus.

Pros

  • Excellent playability
  • Comprehensive peripherals and accessories

Cons

  • It looks like a toy
  • Some may find the inclusions too much and would opt for a better ukulele at the same price point instead

8. EleUke Peanut Ukulele – The Compact and Portable Choice

EleUke Peanut Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.3 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 4.33 inches
  • Weight: 2.64 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: fully electric build, bluetooth compatibility, amazing form factor

This is definitely the craziest entry on the list, boasting for a full electric set-up for a ukulele with great shape and form factor. It’s a technological feat, despite the fact that it overlooks the ukulele’s acoustic feature. But what it lacks it makes up for in a list of features, including it’s very portable shape and size, it’s wireless/bluetooth compatibility, So basically, it’s built like an electric guitar, from the strap lock, to the knobs, and even the electronic components. You all have got to check this out!

Pros

  • Great design
  • Great (and pretty rare) shape 
  • Great instrument quality, peripherals and build

Cons

  • The lack of acoustic compatibility might be a blunder for some players
  • Peripherals may be expensive to replace when broken

Tips

If the list above still has you scratching your head, the following tips just might help in clearing the air out. Have a read through below! 

A $200 ukulele is a great mid-tier instrument

At this price point, we can easily sub-divide the instrument into those that fall above or below $150. You couldn’t expect much from the price range below $150, but it could still definitely deliver as needed. For those ukulele choices that go above $150, you can expect a more polished and premium quality reflecting on the finish and the build. You can specifically check this out when you try to play through it as it would reflect on the neck feel, the fretboard feel, and how good the individual frets are when you hold the strings down and try to play. The sound emitted would also be different, as more expensive ukuleles tend to give a fuller, richer, and warmer sound and tone than that of a cheaper one. The stark contrast can be heard when you let out a few strums, as a cheaper ukulele would usually sound thinner than it’s more expensive counterpart. 

The good thing about this price point is that it allows for some breathing room in choosing a really good ukulele that can last you a long time. At $200, you’re sure to get a great quality instrument, a bag, and a few accessories to go along with it such as a tuner or a capo. 

Never go lower than $50

Tempting as the price may seem, it definitely wouldn’t make up for sound. It also doesn’t help that you can’t try the instrument since you’re buying it online. The main takeaway here is that there’s no point in buying a ukulele with no longevity – as once you get more used to it you’d figure out that it sounds bad and you’d want to replace it immediately

Buying something under $100 would never be premium

Don’t expect $300 quality if you’re willing to cash out as much. These ukuleles above would have their own peculiarities, but it stands more on small parts of the aesthetic rather than that of messing with the general tone and sound. These include run-ons with the glue, imperfect wood cuts, or things being a bit shaky or loose, but all these would surely be playable nonetheless.

Don’t overthink it, it’s just a ukulele! 

Despite having so many rules to follow and think about, everything we have on the list above is a sure pleaser that brings satisfaction guaranteed. It may not be as amazing as the instrument your favorite artist would use, but these entry-level ukuleles know how to charm their way out in terms of having super close quality in terms of tone and sound. So don’t obsess on thinking, just cop yourself one and start making music!

So before you go out and pick that ukulele that you think is perfect for you, here are some factors to consider and keep in mind as you try and get started on figuring out the perfect iteration of this instrument for you! 

The eternal struggle of price vs quality

Getting things at the best possible quality means that you’re willing to shell out the optimal amount of money to achieve those expected premium results. When purchasing a ukulele, the material that actually drives the price up and down is actually the wood it’s made out of.

Aptly called the “tonewood”, it makes up for much of the sound the instrument can make, with the instrument’s shape, size, and string material only falling behind it. Clearly, having yourself a non-wood ukulele would make the entire conversation different but it’s common knowledge that most of those are not at par with traditional tonewood-made ukuleles. To give you a clearer vision, having a ukulele sit at the $25 to $50 price range can only go so far as to get you a toy ukulele that’s more of a prop than an instrument. But at $50 to $100, there are some great choices to check out, try, and eventually be acquainted with. 

Moving forward, let’s look deeper into the entries and do a blow-by-blow analysis on all of them.

First thing you’d want to consider is the size. As a ukulele gets bigger, the sound gets deeper and fuller as the pitch also goes down accordingly. This means that the Enya X1 Tenor Ukulele’s sound wound be much higher than that of the Caramel Ebony Baritone Ukulele. The pitch that would sit in between the two would be that of the Luna Mahogany Concert Ukulele. 

The next thing you’d want to consider is the shape and form factor. Some ukuleles have cutaways that may seem intrusive for some playstyles such as the Enya Carbon Fiber Concert Ukulele and the Luna Mahogany Concert Ukulele. Aside from that, every other ukulele is almost always symmetrical, making it easy to switch from any handedness. There’s also the position of the soundhole to consider, as the Caramel Ebony Baritone Ukulele had decided to give it a bias on the left side that makes it easy to block the sound coming out if the hand hovers there as you play. There’s also the EleUke’s peanut form factor that minimizes the size but maximizes on the electronics.

The last thing you’d want to check out is the finish. Aesthetic is the last thing you’d ever want to take into consideration, as the sound is of top concern. This is an instrument primarily, and looking cool using it would only be secondary. A good example would be the Luna Mahogany Concert Ukulele’s shark teeth tattoo finish or the Kala Mahogany Tenor Ukulele’s flower design as it’s a Mandy Harvey signature. 

Verdict

After all the shenanigans, let’s talk about the top picks. The top 3 for this list from first to third would be the Enya Carbon Fiber Ukulele, the Caramel Ebony Baritone Ukulele, then the Kala Mahogany Tenor Ukulele. 

Let’s talk about the Enya Carbon Fiber Ukulele first. This Polycarbonate – Carbon Fiber entry stands quite strong, especially that it can surprisingly deliver despite the atypical material and form factor of the ukulele. To top that, it also boasts an acoustic electric set up that easily makes it a good deal at less than $200.

Next up is the Caramel Ebony Baritone Ukulele that sports quite a rare and aesthetic tonewood along with a soundhole placed quite off-cener to complete it’s very unique look. The baritone tuning might give some difficulty for players to adjust. Other than that, the guitar is spectacular and it surely delivers as a good ukulele under $200. 

Lastly we have the Kala Mahogany Tenor Ukulele. Being the industry standard when it comes to ukuleles, it is of no question to why Kala should be on this list. It delivers spectacular performance and premium quality at the best possible prices. Having this standard tenor surely is a treat, making sure its an instrument that’s going to stay with you for quite a long time. 

Owning your own instrument would always end with you deciding which iteration you’re most comfortable using in the long term. Comparing features and only getting what you actually need would also be a decision that would come into play, but it ultimately ends up with you going for something pretty that sounds great to your ears. 

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