/ / The Ultimate List of Best Ukuleles Under 300 Dollars 2021

The Ultimate List of Best Ukuleles Under 300 Dollars 2021

Best Ukuleles

Ukuleles are a great go-to instrument for people who are looking to get into playing string instruments. It’s use of nylon strings make it easy to press, and it’s short scale and 4-string set up make it easy for people to learn and adapt fast. Unlike that of an acoustic guitar, ukuleles are usually smaller in shape and are easier to carry and bring around – making them an apt instrument to be the gateway in learning how to play a guitar. Though one thing that seems to attract people to this instrument is it’s peculiar high-pitched sound that easily stands out when played side by side with a regular guitar. People who pick this instrument up usually have no trouble in getting acquainted and being comfortable with it in no time. To make sure you’re getting a great quality ukulele, we’re giving you eight ukulele selections at the $300 or less tier. So what are you waiting for? Let’s get on with it!

Top 8 Ukuleles Under $300

Acoustic-Electric Ukulele

This pop star-spangled instrument surprisingly delivers beyond the branding, as Fender ensures to assert how great their craftsmanship is while also making sure Eilish won’t be let down.

Read Our Review
4.8 rating
4.8
4.8
4.8 rating
Tenor Acacia Cedar Top Ukulele

Kala’s solid Cedar top entry on the Tenor range solidifies their expert craftsmanship on the ukulele, easily asserting themselves as masters of the ukulele game.

Read Our Review
4.8 rating
4.8
4.8
4.8 rating
Travel Tenor Ukulele

The travel series of the Kala aims to cut on size but not on performance, and this Koa Tenor makes sure to let you know that is the case. It’s light, resonant, and has lustrous tones – offering a perfect balance no other ukulele can give.

Read Our Review
4.7 rating
4.7
4.7
4.7 rating
Travel Concert Ukulele

The concert counterpart of Kala’s travel line fares as good as it’s tenor version, offering the same performance at different types and flavors of tone.

Read Our Review
4.7 rating
4.7
4.7
4.7 rating
Solid Pau Ferro Tenor Ukulele

This solid cedar top Kala proves to be a worthy competitor at the price point, offering warmth and tones that far exceed expectations – typical of a Kala ukulele.

Read Our Review
4.6 rating
4.6
4.6
4.6 rating
Lanikai Ukulele

This all-mahogany offering from Lanikai proves to be a worthy showstopper, boasting quality hardware to come with the expertly-crafted woodwork to bring out a ukulele that’s just splendid overall.

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4.6 rating
4.6
4.6
4.6 rating
Electric Ukulele

Oscar Schmidt’s entry makes use of spalted mango and abalone to deliver a ukulele that offers stunning looks and amazing sounds. Packed to the brim with great hardware and inclusions, it’s a buy that definitely won’t disappoint.

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4.4 rating
4.4
4.4
4.4 rating
Enya Tenor Ukulele

Enya’s Spruce-Rosewood entry in the tenor range is well worth noting, as the craftsmanship and woodwork alongside the great hardware included makes up for a ukulele that’s hard to miss and overlook.

Read Our Review
4.3 rating
4.3
4.3
4.3 rating

1. Fender Billie Eilish Signature Acoustic-Electric Ukulele – The Signature Choice

Acoustic-Electric Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.8 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: sapele wood
  • Thickness: 4.1 inches
  • Weight: 2.85 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: acoustic-electric hybrid

It’s not everyday that guitar giant Fender would make a ukulele, but they’d definitely take on the hassle as long as it’s for Z-gen pop sensation Billie Eilish. Sporting a matte black finish and adorned with Billie’s iconic “blohsh” symbol, this ukulele guitar is definitely more than meets the eye. Not only is the headstock sporting a stratocaster shape, but it’s electronics are also top notch – with Fender managing to partner with Fishman to have a Fishman Kula preamp that makes it super easy to line in and start playing.

Pros

  • Limited edition
  • Great, one of a kind aesthetic
  • Great tone and sound from rare tonewood
  • Pre-installed high-quality pickup

Cons

  • Might be too expensive for its kind 
  • Better to keep and retain value than use for higher resale point in the future’
  • Blohsh design might not be for everyone to adore 

2. Kala KA-ATP-CTG Tenor Acacia Cedar Top Ukulele Gloss Finish Natural – The Classic Choice

Tenor Acacia Cedar Top Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.8 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Acacia/Cedar wood
  • Thickness: 6 inches
  • Weight: 0.0055 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: Cedar wood offers a soft, lush tone that’s unique to its kind

Kala is definitely no stranger to manufacturing great quality ukuleles that are internationally-acclaimed, and this Cedar Top tenor proves that point quite strongly. Binded with Acacia, this ukulele is built mostly on Cedarwood, offering soft, lush tones anyone can easily get acquainted to and fall in love with. It also has Aquila Super Nylgut strings already installed that work perfectly with the GraphTech NuBone nut. Overall, it’s a classic choice for a ukulele that would never disappoint.

Pros

  • Rare cedarwood built
  • Top-of-the-line nut and strings 
  • Wonderful build quality by Kala

Cons

  • Not everyone may like the gloss finish
  • The feel of the mahogany neck may be weird for some 
  • Fret size may be too small for some players 

3. Kala KA-KTU-T Koa Travel Tenor Ukulele – A Convenient Choice

Travel Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.7 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Koa
  • Thickness: 1.42 inches
  • Weight: 2.59 pound
  • Outstanding feature: a thin ukulele that’s super easy to bring around

This Kala entry easily sets itself apart from the others – as it sports a “travel” branding onto its name while also cutting down the thickness to about a third of its original size. Despite the rather large chip-off, the ukulele still manages to deliver as expected (which makes it a bit more surprising since it works like magic!). Brandished along its Koa body is a beautiful mahogany neck that sports a Graph Tech nut and tuners along with D’Addario Clear Nylon strings as some sort of cherry on top of the cake. Overall, it’s a ukulele that’s something one should try before knocking it off , as it’s definitely performing way past than what it’s appearance can only seem to achieve.

Pros

  • It offers signature style and sound at a competitive price
  • Despite sporting a thin body, it still can deliver as good as it’s thicker counterparts

Cons

  • The others may not like the aesthetic 
  • Some might be put off on over how thin the ukulele guitar is 

4. Kala KA-KTU-C Koa Travel Concert Ukulele – The Traveler’s Other Tonal Option

Travel Concert Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.7 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: Koa
  • Thickness: 1.42 inches
  • Weight: 1.05 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: it’s pretty compact for something that delivers the charm and tone of a concert ukulele

It’s the concert counterpart of the tenor travel from Kala. Sporting the same Koa body and mahogany neck, it also comes with the Graph Tech nut and tuners, the D’Addario Clear Nylon strings, and the same charm it’s smaller counterpart bestows. Boasting the range of a concert ukulele in this thin body is no easy feat, but Kala’s Travel-sized Koa makes it seem as if it’s not breaking a sweat in doing so. If you don’t believe us, well, it’s best you try it out for yourself!

Pros

  • It offers signature style and sound at a competitive price
  • Despite sporting a thin body, it still can deliver as good as it’s thicker counterparts

Cons

  • The others may not like the aesthetic 
  • Some might be put off on over how thin the ukulele guitar is 

5. Kala All Solid Cedar Top Solid Pau Ferro Tenor Ukulele – A Rare Option

Solid Pau Ferro Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.6 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Pau Ferro – Cedar
  • Thickness: 9.84 inches
  • Weight: 2 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: made from a rare wood combo – Pau Ferro and Cedar

This combo of Pau Ferro and Cedar is definitely to die for, as it boasts warm tones, great volume, and an overall sweet resonating balance. To even make things better, it has a Graph Tech nut and D’Addario Clear Nylon strings to further enunciate the exquisite nature of this specific ukulele. The price point may be a bit steeper than usual, but it’s definitely worth that dent in the wallet

Pros

  • Rare cedar – pau ferro built
  • Top-of-the-line nut and strings 
  • Wonderful build quality by Kala 

Cons

  • Not everyone may like the tone quality 
  • The feel of the mahogany neck may be weird for some 
  • Fret size may be too small for some players 

6. Lanikai Ukulele – The Simple Choice

Lanikai Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.6 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Concert
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 2.76 inches
  • Weight: 1.19 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: all solid mahogany, glossy finish, open back tuners

Lanikai proves to be a worthy competitor alongside the likes of Kala and Fender, showing off all it has got in this price point. Featuring a all solid mahogany body that can never go wrong in tone and sound projection, it also adds some Deluxe Grover Chrome back tuners, a NuBone XB nut and saddle, and an amazing case to keep this beauty well protected. What more can you ask for? It’s definitely a good buy to try out and play on!

Pros

  • Great design
  • Great tone and sound projection
  • Great instrument quality, peripherals and build
  • Great foam-clad hard case

Cons

  • It might be too simple for its price point
  • The feel of the fretboard might not be for everybody

7. Oscar Schmidt OU7TE Spalted Mango Tenor Acoustic/Electric Ukulele – The Complete Choice

Electric Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.4 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Spalted Mango
  • Thickness: 2 inches
  • Weight: 2 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: acoustic-electric set up, aquila nylgut strings, amazing accessories

This Oscar Schmidt entry strikes different with its spalted mango tonewood that’s known for it’s peculiarly superior resonance. Toughened by abalone wood binding and rosette, it also sports Aquila Nylgut strings, UK2000 active electronics, and deluxe Grover chrome tuners with ebonite buttons. It even comes with it’s own clip-on tuner, padded gig bag, and an extra guitar cable for an easier way to jam and start rocking out!

Pros

  • Excellent tone wood
  • Great quality build
  • Rare wood type 

Cons

  • Some people may not like the sound and feel of spalted mango wood
  • Some may find the inclusions too much and would opt for a better ukulele at the same price point instead
  • The electronics included could be better at this price point 

8. Enya Tenor Ukulele 26 Inch Solid Engelmann Spruce Top with Solid Rosewood Back and Sides – The Different Choice

Enya Tenor Ukulele
Editor’s Rating:  
4.3 rating

Specs:

  • Size: Tenor
  • Material: Mahogany
  • Thickness: 6 inches
  • Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Outstanding feature: great build, cute aesthetic, well-made gig bag

Enya’s sole entry on this list proves to be worthy of making it – offering a well built ukulele that’s sure to be enjoyed by anyone playing with it! Made from a mix of solid Engelmann spruce and redwood, this ukulele offers great tones and sound projection despite its size. It also has gold opening tuners, handmade flower inlays, and Enya fluorocarbon strings that pair well with the ukulele guitar.

Pros

  • Great design
  • Great quality build
  • Amazing gig bag included

Cons

  • Might be too expensive for some given the type of ukulele 
  • The aesthetic may not be for everyone 

Tips

The list may prove to be a bit more intimidating and we do understand what you feel! Here’s some more things you should check out so you can consider the options better!

A $300 ukulele opens windows to great options

The 300 dollar price point is quite hefty for a ukulele, that’s why it’s better to think things through quite a bit more especially that you’re cashing out quite an amount of money for the ukulele. Thing is, the amount we’re working with right now gives a lot of room to get great tonewoods and builds, but some still tend to go a bit cheap on the quality at this price point. We’re expecting that you’re well acquainted with ukuleles by now since you’re getting one at this price point. Some great things to keep in mind would be to check on how full, warm, and deep the tone is, how loud and sustained the sound projection is, how the neck feels, and how the frets are sized. Teetering at the end of your train of thought should be the inclusions and aesthetic which usually just serves as a bonus. The differences by this point of the price may only steer away a bit from one another, but if you’re ears are good enough we believe you’d be able to tell

Sometimes, a part of the price accounts for the number of accessories included

This is usually never a good thing, as you’d be left paying for roughly $100 worth of accessories that you may only rarely use while you end up shortchanged with a ukulele you can get for cheap on it’s own. Most listings tend to make it seem as if you’re getting everything else for free, while in fact the truth is that they’re just really looking to push the other items with the ukulele guitar. 

There would always be a stark difference at every $100 increase in price 

Don’t expect $300 quality if you’re not willing to cash out as much. These ukuleles are priced at a premium for a reason, and basically you’re paying off the lack of headaches, the better feel for an instrument, and overall, the fuller, deeper and richer tone that only great builts and good quality wood can achieve. 

Don’t be too hard on yourself, it’s just a ukulele

At $300, the ukulele you’d be getting yourself would be a really good one, so I believe there’s no point to be overly anxious and get weary on overthinking the instrument you prefer. A $300 budget would suffice in you getting a proper ukulele that sounds super good. At the end of the day, what matters is what you make from the instrument rather than what it actually is. Your skill would be the most valuable asset here, as the ukulele would only be a weapon to wield in making music. Case in point, if you feel like the current ukulele you are bound to own doesn’t suffice, then that would be the time to move to a more prestigious or grandiose option. But truth be told, the need to acquire and try everything out doesn’t really end. 

Other things to weigh in

There’s always some struggle towards balancing out the price with quality, as people are more than eager to shell out the smallest possible amount of money while also reaching for the best quality of instrument they can get. Thing is, this shouldn’t be a problem at $300, especially that it offers a lot of room for great choices and great selections.

If anything, what really pumps and pulls the price of ukuleles is the main component it’s made out of -which is the tonewood. These variances of woods used to create ukuleles allows for different flavors to choose from in terms of sound, as every wood has a distinct tone, style, and sound projection offered. For example, there’s the Enya 26 Inch Tenor Ukulele that’s made out of pure mahogany. It’s everyone’s common choice when it comes to building ukuleles, as it offers punchy tones and it can colorfully bring out the high end which the ukuleles are known for. Then there’s also the Kala KA-KTU-C Koa Travel Concert Ukulele that’s made from Koa. Koa is distinctly hawaiian in flavor, offering some mids and a lot of highs that balances brightness and warmth wonderfully on the instrument. Lastly, there’s the Kala All Solid Cedar Top Solid Pau Ferro Tenor Ukulele that’s made from Pau Ferro. It offers a sound with the highs a bit rounded out, as the wood tends to tone down the brightness and give some sort of damper to the punch ukuleles are known to offer. 

Another thing you’d want to consider is the size. As a ukulele gets bigger, the sound gets deeper and fuller as the pitch also goes down accordingly. This means that the Kala KA-ATP-CTG Tenor Ukulele’s sound would be much higher than that of the Kala KA-KTA-C Koa Travel Tenor Concert Ukulele. 

The next thing you’d want to consider is the shape and form factor. Some ukuleles have cutaways that may seem intrusive for some play styles. Aside from that, every other ukulele is almost always symmetrical, making it easy to switch from any handedness. There’s also the position of the soundhole to consider, while some offer a different form factor just for the heck of it. 

The last thing you’d want to check out is the finish. Aesthetic is the last thing you’d ever want to take into consideration, as the sound is of top concern. This is an instrument primarily, and looking cool using it would only be secondary. A good example would be the Oscar Scmidt OU7TE’s spalted mango finish or the Enya Tenor Ukulele’s handmade flower designs. 

Verdict

After all the shenanigans, let’s talk about the top picks. The top 3 for this list from first to third would be Fender’s Billie Eilish Signature Tenor Ukulele, the Kala KA-ATP-CTG Acacia-Cedar Tenor Ukulele, then the Kala KA-KTU-T Koa Travel Tenor Ukulele

Let’s talk about Fender’s Billie Eilish signature first. This matte entry embed with the pop star’s signature blohsh design is a sure show stealer at any show you bring it to. Not to mention the fact, of course, that it’s a well built instrument with great hardware and a cool looking headstock to boot. All this under $500? What a steal! 

Next up is the Kala Tenor Acacia-Cedar that provides quite a soft warm toop that’s as rich and deep as you want it to. The guitar sounds just as amazing as it looks, making sure to offer a ukulele that’s more of a pick up and play kind of instrument. Kala once again proves they got what it takes to be the best, and this entry easily solidifies that point. 

Lastly we have the KalaKoa Travel Ukulele. This guitar easily proves that cutting down size doesn’t necessarily mean one should cut down the quality of sound an instrument can give. Compensating with thicker wood to maintain that signature Kala tone we all know and love, this ukulele easily proves why Kala is a recurring name on every ukulele listicle ever put out. 

Owning your own instrument would always end with you deciding which iteration you’re most comfortable using in the long term. Comparing features and only getting what you actually need would also be a decision that would come into play, but it ultimately ends up with you going for something pretty that sounds great to your ears. 

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